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Things to Do in Boracay

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Crocodile Island
3 Tours and Activities

Don’t worry—there aren’t any crocodiles cruising the waters at this popular Boracay island. Instead you’ll find schools of colorful fish and vibrant, healthy corals, that make this one of the best places to go snorkeling and swimming in Boracay. The waters here can be crystal clear—particularly in the peak season—and it’s a happening stop on island hopping tours that explore the Boracay coast.

It isn’t just snorkelers who flock here, however, as Crocodile Island is also one of the best spots to go scuba diving in Boracay. The wall here begins at 15 feet and it’s a relatively shallow dive, which makes it a good spot for intro divers or those who have just become certified. Watch as schools of silvery fish go flitting in front of your face, and corals waves in the gentle currents and spring up out of the reef. There’s even the chance of spotting a turtle at it lazily swims on by, before climbing aboard your Boracay boat and exploring the rest of the coast.

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Crystal Cove Island

The island of Boracay has stunning white beaches and perfectly turquoise water, but one thing missing is a rocky coast where you can scramble through a tunnel, emerge in a cave, and watch waves explode on the rocks. Luckily Crystal Cove Island next door has not one, but two different sea caves, where you walk down a staircase or crouch beneath rocks to hear the ocean as it thunders. This 6-acre, privately owned island off of Boracay is popular with Boracay island hopping tours, where in addition to touring the caves on shore, you also get the chance to snorkel and swim along the rocky coastline. The first cave is easily accessible, but the second requires crouching down and scrambling through a small tunnel, before eventually emerging in a massive cave with ledges for snapping a few photos.

You can also enjoy a picnic on the island if you choose to visit on your own, and eat your lunch with a panoramic view of five different islands offshore. There’s also a museum with seashell art and other locally made crafts, and a small restaurant with restrooms and drinks just steps from a white sand beach.

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Balinghai Beach

On an island that’s known for its spectacular beaches, Balinghai Beach on northwestern Boracay is a private, white sand stunner. Much smaller than White Beach—where Boracay comes to party—Balinghai Beach is on a section of coast that can only be reached by sailing canoe or a footpath from Balinghai Resort. The beach is technically open to the public, but you’ll need to pay a day use fee of about $10 per person. The fee is good all day, however, and allows access to beach facilities like cabanas and chairs, and there’s even a popular oceanfront restaurant for ordering some food and drinks.

While the sand here at Balinghai isn’t as soft as neighboring White Beach, the sunsets are arguably much more romantic since it’s set in an intimate cove, and the only sound is of waves on the sand and wind rustling in the trees. To visit Balinghai Beach in Boracay, join in a 6-hour island hopping tour that explores the coastline and coves.

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