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Things to Do in Caribbean Coast

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Lost City (Ciudad Perdida)
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The Lost City, or Ciudad Perdida, is the archaeological site of an ancient indigenous city in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. Thought to have been a commercial center for trade around 700 A.D., its population probably ranged between 1,400 and 3,000 inhabitants. Hidden in the jungle for over a thousand years, the Lost City was found in 1972 when treasure hunters followed a series of stone steps leading up to an abandoned city.

The Lost City is open to visitors, but the trip is not for the faint of heart. The nearly 30 mile trek takes visitors through farmland and jungle on an unforgettable six-day journey. Part of the adventure includes trekking over mountains filled with exotic plants and animals, climbing stone paths through dense jungle, bathing in waterfalls and sleeping in indigenous villages.

Upon arriving at Lost City, climb more than 1,000 stone steps to the top of the site for incredible views of the surrounding mountains and jungle. Take time to explore the more than 250 stone terraces that were carved out of the mountainside, each of which was a space for living and working. The different areas of the city were joined to the fields by a network of cobbled paths and stairs, and an irrigation system channels rainwater downhill to avoid damage and erosion.

Members of local tribes, including the Arhuacos, Koguis, and others, continue to maintain many of their ancestral beliefs and customs. They visited the site regularly before it was widely discovered, and gave it the name Teyuna. This trek takes you through some of their villages where life has remained unchanged for centuries.

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Totumo Mud Volcano (El Totumo)
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Totumo Volcano (El Totumo) ranks among Cartagena’s most popular day trips. A small volcanic caldera has become a top attraction—a naturally heated bath of grayish brown silt. After bobbing around in the soupy mix, head to the lagoon next door to wash off the mineral-rich mud, thought to have therapeutic properties.

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Old Town Cartagena
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With brightly-colored buildings, colonial landmarks, and bougainvillea-covered balconies, Old Town Cartagena is known for its beauty and its UNESCO World Heritage Site status. Highlights include the leafy Plaza de Bolivar, the striking Clock Tower (Torre del Reloj), and the Gold Museum (Museo de Oro).

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San Felipe de Barajas Castle (Castillo San Felipe de Barajas)
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Some historians say that if it weren’t for San Felipe de Barajas Castle (Castillo San Felipe de Barajas), South America would now speak English. The 14th-century fortress protected the coastal city of Cartagena from English invasion, allowing the Spanish to maintain their rule. Besides the role it plays in Colombia’s history, the castle attracts visitors with its panoramic harbor views.

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Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta National Park
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Just off the coast of northern Colombia, the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta National Park is home to a wealth of endangered flora and fauna as well as the world’s highest coastal peak. Dominated by mountains and popular among hikers, this UNESCO-recognized national park is home to bird reserves, archaeological ruins, and indigenous villages.

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Tayrona National Park (Parque Nacional Natural Tayrona)
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Ruins, reefs, mangroves, and beaches make up the 37,000-acre Tayrona National Park, one of Colombia’s most popular ecotourism destinations. Visit to hike along the coast, relax on the beaches, snorkel among the coral reefs, or simply disconnect from daily life.

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Crystal Beach (Playa Cristal)
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On the edge of Tayrona National Natural Park and the northern coast of Colombia, Crystal Beach(Playa Cristal) is one of the most picturesque white sand beaches in South America. Its clear turquoise waters provide ideal conditions for swimming and snorkeling. Many come to relax on the soft sand shaded by coconut palms or to eat fresh seafood caught right off the shore. It is also a great base for exploring the Tayrona National Park, one of Colombia’s most important protected ecological areas, for the day.

Marine life in the waters off Crystal Beach(Playa Cristal) includes sea turtles, dolphins, and several species of fish. Even without spotting one these creatures, the coral and sponges of the reef provide colorful underwater scenes. The Caribbean reefs offshore also attract those seeking scuba diving and other water sports.

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Quinta de San Pedro Alejandrino
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Simón Bolivar is viewed as the Liberator of much of northern South America and is considered one of the most important Latin American political figures who ever lived. He was born in Caracas, the son of wealthy landowners, and led the independence movement, eventually achieving independence from Spain for what was then called Gran Colombia, covering most of northern South America.

Simón Bolivar spent his last days at La Quinta de San Pedro Alejandrino near Santa Marta, a quinta (large house) and hacienda (farm) built in the 17th century. At that time the estate produced rum, honey and panela, a sugar cane product. Bolivar died of tuberculosis in one of the rooms there on December 17, 1830.

Now the Quinta is a tourist site, museum and historical landmark. The main house, painted a deep yellow color, is where Simon Bolivar breathed his last breath. Here you can find the bed he used, important documents and other objects that help recreate the Liberator’s life, and paintings depicting Bolivar and the area at the time he visited.

The house and grounds are open for exploring. Cool down in the extensive gardens under trees that are hundreds of years old. A statute of Simon Bolivar (without his ever-present horse) is one of the centerpieces of the garden. A monument called the Patrimony Altar (Altar de la Patria) was built on the site for the100th anniversary of Bolivar’s death. The museum also contains art donated by many of the countries he helped liberate.

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Rosario Islands (Islas del Rosario)
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The Rosario Islands(Islas del Rosario) are a highlight of Colombia’s Caribbean Coast, famous for their vibrant marine life, pristine white beaches, and sun-soaked beach resorts. A cluster of 28 idyllic islands dotted offshore of the port city of Cartagena, this archipelago sits atop the world’s third-largest barrier reef and makes up Islas del Rosario National Park.

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Convento de la Popa de la Galera
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Sitting atop the highest point in Cartagena, Convento de la Popa is a 17th-century convent characterized by graceful stone arcades and an interior courtyard filled with flowers. History and architecture aside, the biggest draw of the convent is the scenery: from the 500-foot (152-meter) perch, travelers are rewarded with sweeping views of the Caribbean coast and colonial city.

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More Things to Do in Caribbean Coast

Old Shoes Monument (Los Zapatos Viejos)

Old Shoes Monument (Los Zapatos Viejos)

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Located at the base of San Felipe Castle, the Old Shoes Monument (Los Zapatos Viejos) is a giant sculpture of a pair of old boots. A popular spot for a selfie, the monument was created by Hector Lombana Piñeres in response to the poem “Mi Ciudad Nativa” by local poet (and one of South America’s most respected writers) Luis Carlos López.

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Las Bovedas

Las Bovedas

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Shoppers, barhoppers, and photography enthusiasts flock to picturesque Las Bovedas, located at the northeastern corner of Cartagena’s old walled city. Dozens of archways—stretching from Santa Clara to Santa Catalina Fortress—are home to souvenir shops, jewelry stores, small bars, and galleries.

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Gold Museum (Museo de Oro Zenu)

Gold Museum (Museo de Oro Zenu)

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Opened in 1982, Cartagena's Gold Museum (Museo de Oro Zenu) is dedicated to Colombia's indigenous Zenu people. Housed in a grand colonial building facing the Plaza Bolivar, the first room greets visitors with a pre-Hispanic golden jaguar and an ornate gold filigree butterfly. In fact, there are 538 gold pieces to see, as well as 61 carvings, including bone carvings, which you'll find in the next room — La Sociedad — dedicated to the body painting and textile traditions of the Zenú.

The final exhibit, La Epoca Hidráulico, profiles the Zenú people's hydraulic engineering feats. It's estimated that, up to 2,500 years ago, half a million hectares of Panzenu land was cultivated with the aid of a vast network of hand-excavated canals that ran up to 4km long and 10 meters wide, making them some of the largest man-made features in the Americas. Cartagena’s Gold Museum also has an onsite bookshop and auditorium.

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Bolivar Square (Plaza Bolivar)

Bolivar Square (Plaza Bolivar)

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As well as offering respite from Cartagena’s Caribbean heat with its leafy trees, Bolivar Square (Plaza Bolivar) is home to both the Palace of the Inquisition museum and the Gold Museum (Museo de Oro Zenu). In between museums, sample Colombian coffee and snacks from street vendors and admire the eponymous statue of Simon Bolivar at the square’s center.

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Santo Domingo Church (Iglesia de Santo Domingo)

Santo Domingo Church (Iglesia de Santo Domingo)

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Founded in 1534, Santo Domingo Church (Iglesia Santo Domingo) is the oldest church in Cartagena. As well as being notable for its marble altar and imposing central nave, the church boasts a prime location on Plaza Santo Domingo, where street vendors and al fresco cafes create a vibrant atmosphere.

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Museo del Oro (Gold Museum)

Museo del Oro (Gold Museum)

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The Tayrona Gold Museum contains some of the fascinating gold pieces made by the Tayrona indigenous tribe starting around 100 A.D and gives a look into the culture of those early inhabitants of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. Many of the objects on display were made using the lost wax method in order to create life-like hollow gold objects. The Tayrona also used alloys made with gold and copper calledtumbaga and would hammer out sheets of gold on rock slabs.

The Tayronas were a deeply religious community and their gold pieces were rich in detail and meaning. A common theme involved representations of animals, reflecting the custom of the political and spiritual leaders who adopted qualities and strengths they associated with certain animals.

To make gold figures, the lost wax method was one of the most common methods used. A wax figure would be covered with clay in order to create a mold. When the object was heated, the wax would melt out. Then gold or metal was poured in the resulting space. After the metal cooled, the clay would be broken to leave the gold figure, which was then polished.

The Gold Museum is normally located in the Custom’s House (Casa de la Aduana), a Cultural Patrimony building on the Santa Marta bay that is currently under restoration work. In the meantime, the collection has found a temporary home in the Bank of the Republic Library.

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El Rodadero

El Rodadero

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Backed by luxury high-rise hotels and popular among Colombian travelers, El Rodadero is a lively, local alternative to the internationally popular Playa Blanca.

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Carlos El Pibe Valderrama Statue

Carlos El Pibe Valderrama Statue

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Former Colombian football player Carlos El PibeValderrama is known for his athletic ability and his outgoing personality, and this 22-foot-tall bronze statue of him in his hometown conveys both qualities. He is known as “El Pibe” or “the kid” and for his blond curly head of hair. His distinct personality has made him one of the most recognizable figures in football worldwide. Part of the Colombian national team in the 1990s, he represented Colombia in several international tournaments and became known for his skills in passing and accuracy in assisting. He is one of few foreign players who joined Major League Soccer in the United States.

His statue is the work of Colombian artist Amilkar Ariza, standing tall outside the Estadio Eduardo Santos in Santa Marta. It was erected in 2006 in honor of his contributions to Colombian national sports.

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Cathedral of San Pedro Claver (Iglesia de San Pedro Claver)

Cathedral of San Pedro Claver (Iglesia de San Pedro Claver)

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Cartagena’s Cathedral of San Pedro Claver (Iglesia de San Pedro Claver) immortalizes the life of Saint Pedro Claver, one of the first human rights pioneers in the Americas. The austere stone facade of the cathedral alludes to a peaceful interior, where visitors can pay their respects to the remains of the saint, which are visible through a gilded glass case.

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National Aviary of Colombia (Aviario Nacional de Colombia)

National Aviary of Colombia (Aviario Nacional de Colombia)

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Home to around 190 different species of bird, the National Aviary of Colombia harbors diverse flora and more than 2,000 birds. The 17-acre (7-hectare) park categorises birds according to three Colombian ecosystems—tropical rainforest, coastal zone, and desert—and promises an enriching experience for wildlife lovers.

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Santa Marta Historic Center (Centro Historico de Santa Marta)

Santa Marta Historic Center (Centro Historico de Santa Marta)

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Sandwiched between picturesque beaches and lush mountains, Santa Marta is both the oldest surviving city in Colombia and a gateway to Tayrona National Park. Explore the UNESCO-recognized historic center on foot, making time to visit highlights such as the 18th century cathedral, Tayrona Gold Museum (Museo de Oro Tairona), and Quinta de San Pedro Alejandrino.

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Plaza de San Diego

Plaza de San Diego

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In Cartagena's Old Town, every evening the Plaza de San Diego becomes lively with street performers entertaining the crowds. Vendors sell everything from jewelry to Cuban cigars to paintings, and as the day ends, the traffic gets blocked on two sides so that more outdoor seating can be laid on outside the restaurants lining the square.

Surrounded by ice cream-colored buildings and bougainvillea-covered balconies just outside the Old Town’s core area, the Plaza de San Diego is a lasting relic of the wealth Cartagena held during the days of the gold, sugar, and slave trade's peak. Home to the famous Hotel Santa Clara, the square is a popular place to sit down, order a drink or a bite to eat, and watch the world go by while listening to live music by the local street performers.

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Teatro Adolfo Mejia (Teatro Heredia)

Teatro Adolfo Mejia (Teatro Heredia)

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Built in 1911 to commemorate a century of Colombian independence, Cartagena’s Teatro Adolfo Mejia (Teatro Heredia) was designed by Luis Felipe Jasper and based on the Italian-Caribbean design of Havana’s Tacon Theater. Restored in 1970 and again in 1988, the grand theater is famous for its Italian marble stairs and sculptures, and on the ceiling you can see artwork by the famous Cartagenan artist Enrique Grau.

Located in the Plaza de la Merced in Cartagena’s Old Town, the theater’s performance hall is known for its acoustics and shaped like a horseshoe, with Portuguese wooden balconies looking onto the stage which hosts local and international acts.

Officially named the Teatro Heredia Adolfo Mejia, on the second week of January each year, Teatro Heredia hosts the Classical Music Festival of Cartagena.

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La India Catalina Monument

La India Catalina Monument

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At the main entrance to Cartagena’s Old Town, La India Catalina Monument is a bronze rendering of the Doña Marina of Colombia — India Catalina.

The daughter of a local chief, in 1509 Catalina was abducted, aged 14, from her home in Galerazamba. Once she’d learned Spanish in the Dominican Republic, she was thereon required to accompany the Spanish conquistador Pedro de Heredia as an interpreter and pacifying presence in interactions between the Spanish and indigenous groups.

The local Calamari people were decimated in the Spanish conquest, and that was in part due to Catalina’s collusion with the Spanish. In that sense, it might seem strange that the sculpture of her has become so iconic, but really, it’s a tribute to the indigenous people who inhabited this land before the Spanish conquest.

Sculpted by the Spanish artist Eladio Gil Zambrana and unveiled in 1974, the monument has become so well-known around Cartagena that small-scale replicas are handed out as awards at the Cartagena Film Festival.

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