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Things to Do in Massachusetts

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Boston Public Library
16 Tours and Activities

Founded in 1848, the Boston Public Library contains over 23 million items, making it the second largest public library in the U.S., after the Library of Congress. Of those millions, about 1.7 million are rare books and works, including medieval manuscripts and incunabula (a book or pamphlet printed prior to 1501 in Europe). Among the rare books are also the personal library of John Adams, early editions of works by William Shakespeare, drawings from Thomas Rowlandson and musical archives from the Handel and Haydn Society.

The McKim Building, with its vast research collection, and the Johnson Building, where you can find the circulating collection, are two of the most important parts of the library. The McKim Building is even a National Historic Landmark. And while the library system technically includes a whopping 24 branches, the original Copley Square location offers plenty to see, including Bates Hall, the Chavannes Gallery, the Abbey Room and the Sargent Gallery.

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Old Burying Point (Charter Street Cemetery)
7 Tours and Activities

Also known as the Charter Street Cemetery, the Old Burying Point of Salem is the second oldest burying ground in the United States. It is estimated to date back to 1637. Victims of the infamous Salem With Trials were convicted nearby to the site. Jonathan Corwin and Jonathan Hawthorne, who were both Salem witch trial judges, are also buried here. As Salem was once a major shipping port for “the New World,” this cemetery is particularly historic. A Mayflower pilgrim, one of the first to enter the United States, was claimed to be put to rest here. The grave of former governor Samuel Bradstreet can also be found. The old tombstones remain in tact and uniquely carved from the 1600s, presenting a bit of history that has been preserved since that time. A visit is an opportunity to learn about colonial era history, including burial practices and the lives of some of the important figures laid to rest here.

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Boston North End
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Boston’s oldest residential neighborhood, the North End has been inhabited since the 1630s. Here you’ll find a large variety of historical and culturally attractions. There’s the Paul Revere House, the oldest building in downtown Boston built around 1680 and the place from which he left for his famous “midnight ride” in 1775. Some other historic stops in the North End include Old North Church, Copp’s Hill Burial Ground, Union Wharf, Ozias Goodwin House and Mariner’s House, allowing you to explore the city’s rich heritage as well as old world architecture.

Walking around the area, you’ll notice the smell of fresh baked bread and biscotti permeates the air. Because it has a large community of Italian Americans, the North End is also known as Boston’s Little Italy. Visitors are transported to Italy as they walk the neighbourhood’s narrow streets, full of attached brick buildings housing small shops, delis, butchers, salumerias, bakers, and wine bars.

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Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum
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Few historical events are as synonymous with Boston as the Boston Tea Party. It was during this 1773 demonstration that revolutionaries threw entire cases of British tea into Boston harbor in protest of the Tea Act, quickly evolving into the American Revolution.

Today, this iconic act of defiance has come to symbolize not only the resolve and persistence of the American people as a whole, but of Boston in particular. Nowhere is it more celebrated or better explained than at the Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum. This floating museum prides itself on stepping well beyond the typical, staid museum experience. Visitors are treated to a fully engaging display, complete with live actors, ship restoration displays and interactive exhibits.

Visitors can even join in a mock "tea dumping" protest if they like. The goal is to accurately transport visitors back in time to fully experience the Tea Party as it happened more than 230 years ago.

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USS Constitution
28 Tours and Activities

The USS Constitution is a fascinating example of United States and military history. The 44-gun, Boston-built vessel hearkens back to 1797 when President George Washington ordered that six frigates be constructed at naval yards along the east coast.

“Old Ironsides," as it’s known today, is officially “America’s Ship of State” and one of the most popular and well respected military attractions in the country. Before entering, visit the onsite museum, which provides insight into US military history, including the War of 1812 and the general timeline of the USS Constitution. Once aboard the ship, free guided tours are offered year-round by knowledgeable navy personnel. Visitors are also invited to explore and photograph a large portion of the ship, including the main deck and the level below deck. Select summer visitors are invited to join in a special Constitution Experience.

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Bunker Hill Monument
15 Tours and Activities

The Bunker Hill Memorial is a granite monument built in memory of the Battle of Bunker Hill, the first real battle of the American Revolutionary War.

The Battle of Bunker Hill took place in June 1775 in Charlestown, Massachusetts, when American Revolutionary forces met the British Army during one of the earliest battles of the war. The British ultimately won that battle – although, of course, they would go on to lose the war. The battle itself took place on nearby Breed's Hill, but Bunker Hill was the main objective of both armies – so that's where the Bunker Hill Monument was built. The first monument was built in 1794, made of wood, and stood 18 feet tall. From 1827-1842, the current granite memorial was built. The obelisk resembles the Washington Monument in Washington D.C., towering over the surrounding landscape.

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Massachusetts State House
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24 Tours and Activities

Newcomers to the city of Boston often refer to it as “the city of history” because while walking along the Freedom Trail, you encounter so many important historical points—points that were instrumental in the founding of America. It makes for an incredible walk through time, and one of the highlights on this Freedom Trail is a visit to the Massachusetts State House.

Built in 1788, the “new” Massachusetts State House is built across from the Boston Common on the top of Beacon Hill. Known far and wide for its gilded gold dome (it’s actually made of wood and copper, but topped with 24-karat gold), the State House symbolizes what the founding fathers had envisioned upon landing at Plymouth Rock – to build a city upon a hill. Inside, the working State House houses working government officials, beautiful murals depicting colonial times of war, spacious marble-filled corridors, and other historical items that reflect the heritage of the Boston area.

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Granary Burying Ground
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26 Tours and Activities

Founded in 1660, the Granary Burial Ground is Boston’s third-oldest burial ground, and final resting site of some of the most famous Bostonians to ever walk the earth, including three signers of the Declaration of Independence, Paul Revere, and five victims of the Boston Massacre. With as many as 2,345 graves, few cemeteries anywhere else in the world hold such a high percentage of notable people in such a small space, and for this reason it is routinely featured as a highlight along Boston’s famous Freedom Trail.

Still, there is something timeless about visiting historic cemeteries, and perhaps this is why so many choose to stroll the green lawns of Granary Burial Grounds, thinking of the times before ours, and, perhaps, the time to come afterwards. Notable burials among the Granary Burial Ground include John Hancock (a statesman and signer of the Declaration of Independence), Samuel Adams (also a statesman and signer of the Declaration of Independence).

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More Things to Do in Massachusetts

Copp's Hill Burying Ground

Copp's Hill Burying Ground

7 Tours and Activities

The second-oldest cemetery in Boston, Copp's Hill Burying Ground is a landmark area and peak tourist attraction for those interested in the deep historical roots of Boston – one of the first cities built in the New World. Established in 1659, this burial ground is closing in on 400 years old, and with such tenure comes thousands of interred. A self-guided tour will reveal Boston’s long history of artisans, craftsmen, some notable founding fathers of Boston, as well as thousands of African Americans in unmarked graves on the Snowhill Street side of the burial ground.

Now a stop on the Freedom Trail, Copp’s Hill Burying Ground was added to the list of National Register of Historic Places in 1974 thanks to its repeated interest by tourists and photographers. Strolling the grounds will lend a new perspective on Boston, its peoples, and its history, perhaps best summarized by Thomas Williston’s grave, whose epitaph reads: “Stop here my friend and case an Eye.

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Faneuil Hall Marketplace

Faneuil Hall Marketplace

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36 Tours and Activities

The heart and soul of downtown Boston, Faneuil Hall Marketplace is a bustling complex of restaurants, food stalls, shops, bars, and public spaces. Since it opened in 1976, this festive market and eating center draws both visitors and locals to its cobblestone plaza, teaming with shoppers, street performers, and people-watchers.

Faneuil Hall Marketplace itself if comprised of three historic 19th century buildings. Quincy Market, a three-level Greek revival-style building, sits in the center behind Faneuil Hall. Next to it is the North Market building and the South Market building.

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Quincy Market

Quincy Market

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24 Tours and Activities

The main hub of the Faneuil Hall Marketplace, bustling Quincy Market has attracted locals and visitors alike for nearly 200 years. This historic food hall, set inside a stately three-level Greek revival-style building, is packed with more than 50 shops, 14 restaurants, and 40 food court stops. There’s even a bar that’s an exact replica of the bar from the popular TV show Cheers.

Inside Quincy Market, the central corridor is lined with full-service restaurants, pushcarts, and New England souvenirs. Choose from chowder, bagels, Indian, Greek, baked good, and ice cream. Then, take a seat at one of the tables in the central rotunda. On warm evenings, tables spill outdoors from restaurants and bars fill up with people, creating a festive mood. The rest of the marketplace is made up of the North Market building, the South Market building, and Faneuil Hall. Along with restaurants, you’ll find an intoxicating mix of chain stores and unique shops.

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Boston Old State House

Boston Old State House

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26 Tours and Activities

As the oldest still-standing building in Boston, the Old State House is arguably the most historically significant structure in the city today. Built more than three centuries ago, it stands as the crown jewel of the city's famous Freedom Trail, and many of the country's greatest political achievements and historical moments happened within its four walls. It is appropriately referred to as the "Heart of Revolutionary Boston," as a number of America's forefathers – including John Adams, James Otis, John Hancock and Samuel Adams–discussed the future of the colonies under British rule here. Steps from its entrance, five men died in the Boston Massacre, and the Declaration of Independence was even declared to the people of Boston from its balcony. In subsequent years, the building grew to become the first state house of the Commonwealth. Over the years that followed, it served many functions, including as city hall, post office, a mercantile exchange and even a shopping arcade.

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Freedom Trail

Freedom Trail

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26 Tours and Activities
The Freedom Trail is a great way to explore Boston’s most popular sites. The 2 ½-mile/4-km trail itself links a number of historic sites, many associated with colonial United States history. The route is marked with a line of red paint or red brick on the sidewalk; markers identify stops and plaques point the way from one sight to the next. The Freedom Trail starts on the Boston Common and visits sights on Beacon Hill, in Downtown, near the Waterfront, and in the North End, before crossing the bridge and ending in Charlestown. As such, it provides an introduction to some of Boston’s distinct neighborhoods, as well as its rich history. Along the way, you’ll see the King’s Chapel, Old City Hall, and the Old Corner Bookstore. You’ll visit Faneuil Hall, which is a choice spot to stop for a lunch from the food court in Quincy Market. More sites include Old North Church, Copp’s Hill Burying Ground (with its grand views across the river to Charlestown) and the USS Constitution Museum, home
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Boston Public Garden

Boston Public Garden

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25 Tours and Activities

The Boston Public Garden is a 24 acre (10 hectare) botanical oasis of Victorian flowerbeds, verdant grass, and weeping willow trees shading a tranquil lagoon. At any time of the year, it is an island of loveliness, awash in seasonal blooms, gold-toned leaves, or untrammeled snow.

A statue of George Washington, looking stately atop his horse, greets visitors at the main entrance on Arlington Street. Other pieces of public art in the park, however, are more whimsical. The most endearing is Make Way for Ducklings, always a favorite with tiny tots who can climb and sit on the bronze ducks. But it’s the peaceful lagoon that draws visitors and locals a like to the Public Garden. For it is hear, you should take on the slow-going swan boats, a serene relic of bygone days.

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Boston Harbor Islands National and State Park

Boston Harbor Islands National and State Park

7 Tours and Activities

Boston Harbor Islands National Park is comprised of 34 islands, sprinkled throughout the Boston Harbor. These islands – many of which are open for trail walking, bird-watching, fishing, and swimming – offer a range of ecosystems. On a visit to this park, you’ll encounter sandy beaches, rocky cliffs, fresh and saltwater marsh, and forested trails. Best of all, the islands are only 45 minutes from downtown Boston.

Georges Island is not only one of the transportation hubs for the islands, it is also the site of the 19th century Fort Warren. Spectacle Island, another transportation hub, has walking trails and hosts many special events like live jazz concerts and festivals. Lovells Island draws boaters, swimmers, and sunbathers to its lovely rocky beaches. Here you can catch an afternoon shuttle to Grape Island, where you can pick raspberries, bayberries, and elderberries, all growing wild amid the island’s scrubby wooded trails.

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New England Aquarium

New England Aquarium

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Teeming with more than 15,000 sea creatures of all sizes, shapes, and colors, the New England Aquarium is a giant fishbowl of sea-life wonder. Harbor seals and sea otters frolic in a large observation tank at the entrance, but the main attraction is the awesome four-story, 200,000 gallon (760,000 liter) Giant Ocean Tank, which swirls with more than 600 creatures great and small, including turtles, sharks, and eels. At the base of the tank the penguin pool is home to three species of fun-loving penguins. Countless side exhibits explore the lives and habitats of other underwater oddities, including the two-floor Amazing Jellies exhibit, home to hundreds of ethereal jellyfish, and the Edge of the Sea exhibit, with its sea stars, horseshoe crabs, and sea dragons. Other attractions include displays on denizens of the Amazon, marine life in the Gulf of Maine, and the ecology of Boston Harbor.
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Boston Massacre Site

Boston Massacre Site

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Salem Witch Trials Memorial

Salem Witch Trials Memorial

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Boston Common

Boston Common

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The starting point of the Freedom Trail, Boston Common is the oldest park in the country. At 50 acres/20 hectares, the Common is the anchor for the Emerald Necklace, a system of connected parks that winds through many of Boston’s neighborhoods. The Common has served many purposes over the years, including as a campground for British troops during the Revolutionary War. Today, though, the Common serves picnickers, sunbathers, and people watches. In winter, the Frog Pond attracts ice-skaters, while summer draws theater lovers for Shakespeare on the Common.

Spend a day wandering freely in the Common. Walking paths crisscross its green, which is dotted with such monuments and memorials as the Boston Massacre Monument, the Great Elm Site, and the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial. Nearby sites include the Central Burying Ground and the Boston Athenaeum.

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Charlestown Navy Yard

Charlestown Navy Yard

8 Tours and Activities

Dating back to 1800, Charlestown Navy Yard was among the most prolific, historic, and vital navy yards in U.S. history. It served as the home of many of the nation's elite warships for the purposes of resupply, maintenance, retrofitting, and service.

The navy yard's most critical role was during America's two largest wars before it closed for good in 1974. From the beginning, Charlestown Navy Yard remained a pioneer of shipbuilding technology and served as a center for electronics and missile conversions. During its almost 175-year history, its staff constructed, christened, and launched over 200 ships and serviced thousands more. After its closing, thirty acres of the yard were earmarked as part of Boston National Historical Park. Today, the U.S. National Park Service oversees this most critical portion of the shipyard.

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Paul Revere House

Paul Revere House

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Located in the North End and built around 1680, the Paul Revere House is the oldest building in downtown Boston. It is famous for being the house Revere left from the night of his famous “midnight ride” to warn his compatriots that the British were coming to arrest them. He lived there with his family from 1770 to 1800.

Through the years it has been lived in by many other families and served various purposes, for example, a bank, grocery store and a cigar factory; however, the building was purchased by Revere’s grandson in 1902 and restored by the Paul Revere Memorial Association from 1907 to 1908, allowing it to now serve as a house museum along with the adjacent Pierce-Hitchborn House. Walking inside, visitors are able to appreciate the 17th century appearance and original artifacts like historic documents and Paul Revere’s silverware. Knowledgeable staff and information panels are there to help answer any questions you may have.

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Boston Chinatown

Boston Chinatown

1 Tour and Activity
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