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San Andrés Mixquic
San Andrés Mixquic

San Andrés Mixquic

San Andres Mixquic, Tláhuac, Mexico City, Distrito Federal

The Basics

From October 31 to November 2, this quiet mountain village becomes the ultimate cultural destination. Residents gather to commemorate the Day of the Dead (Día de Muertos), a celebration of loved ones who are no longer living. Graves are elaborately decorated with flowers and candles, and fragrant incense wafts through the air as vendors line the streets around the church, traditional dancers perform in the square, and thousands of visitors fill the cemetery to take part in the time-honored festivities.

You can visit Mixquic independently or as part of a Day of the Dead tour that includes round-trip transportation from your Mexico City hotel.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • San Andrés Mixquic is ideal for anyone wanting an unforgettable Day of the Dead experience.

  • Wear comfortable shoes suitable for walking over uneven surfaces, and tote a jacket or sweater.

  • Always maintain a respectful attitude when you visit the cemetery.

  • Take normal precautions to avoid pickpockets and petty crime, especially after dark.

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How to Get There

The easiest way to Mixquic is via a tour or hired driver, so as to avoid the hassle of driving or navigating public transport. While the journey south from Mexico City can be long due to traffic (1.5 hours at minimum), experiencing this annual festival in Mixquic is well worth the trip.

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Trip ideas

Ways to Experience Mexican Culture in Mexico City

Ways to Experience Mexican Culture in Mexico City


When to Get There

San Andrés Mixquic comes alive for Day of the Dead, though it isn’t much of a destination the rest of the year. The best day to go is November 2, when the celebrations are in full swing and the church cemetery is carpeted in flowers and candles.

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Day of the Dead

Day of the Dead is a multi-day holiday and one of Mexico’s oldest cultural traditions. This festive celebration honors those who have passed with elaborate altars (ofrendas) and special foods. In small communities such as Mixquic, grave sites are decorated with thousands of flowers and candles, and people spend the whole night in the cemetery, welcoming the spirits of their lost loved ones back to earth.

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