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Things to Do in Tokyo

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Fuji Five Lakes (Fujigoko)
5 Tours and Activities

The Fuji Five Lakes are a group of lakes situated at the northern base of the majestic Mount Fuji, around 100 kilometers west of Tokyo. These lakes are Lake Motosu, Lake Shoji, Lake Sai, Lake Kawaguchi, and Lake Yamanaka. Along with its incredible scenery, the area offers ample opportunities for hiking, camping, and fishing. It also features hot springs, museums, and even one of Japan's largest and most popular amusement parks, Fuji-Q Highland. Lake Kawaguchi is easily accessed and offers a wealth of things for visitors to see and do. It’s also a great starting point for climbing Mount Fuji for those inclined to do so, and also popular with Tokyo locals escaping the heat and pace of the city, particularly during the summer. The largest lake is Yamanaka, while perhaps the most picturesque is the horseshoe-shaped Shōji. Elsewhere, Sai and Motosu are great spots to set up camp and enjoy water-based activities such as boating and fishing.

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Kasai Rinkai Park
3 Tours and Activities

Kasai Rinkai Park, Tokyo’s largest park, opened in 1989 on Tokyo Bay, a beautiful area that overlooks the water and the city beyond. Built on reclaimed land, the park was developed with conservation and preservation in mind.

The Diamond and Flowers Ferris Wheel is by far the park’s most famous site, an iconic behemoth that sits 383 feet (117 meters) tall. Any trip to the park is incomplete without the 17-minute ride on the famous structure, as the views from the top encompass all of Tokyo and the surrounding areas, including Mt Fuji on a clear day.

Also on site is the Tokyo Sealife Aquarium, which features an all-glass dome that transports visitors straight into the sea with fish and other aquatic life swimming above, around and below them. There is also the Sea Bird Sanctuary, an outdoor preserve that takes up nearly one-third of the park.

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Sanrio Puroland
1 Tour and Activity

Disneyland is to Mickey Mouse what Sanrio Puroland is to Hello Kitty. The indoor theme park on the western edge of Tokyo attracts 1.5 million visitors a year with its attractions, themed rides, restaurants and musicals based around the Sanrio company’s characters. Westerners may only be familiar with Hello Kitty, but Sanrio also came up with Jewelpet, My Melody and Cinnamoroll among others.

Sanrio Puroland opened in 1990 to mixed reviews, but with a boom in Hello Kitty’s popularity, it’s now one of the most popular attractions in Japan. The park’s hypercute highlights include a life-size version of Kitty’s house, a boat ride filled with Sanrio characters and three theaters with daily live stage productions. Most attractions are aimed at a decidedly young demographic, so if you’re traveling with teenagers, you might be better off at Tokyo Disneyland and DisneySea.

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Meiji Jingu Stadium
2 Tours and Activities

It's not the biggest or most modern baseball stadium in Tokyo, but Meiji Jingu Stadium in Shinjuku is worth visiting for it's unique atmosphere and history. Opened in 1926, it's one of the few stadiums still in existence where Babe Ruth played (along with Lou Gehrig on a 1934, 22-game tour of Japan).

Today it's home to the Tokyo Yakult Swallows, as well as a popular host of many college match-ups. If you have time, it's an excellent place to watch a game. Because it is rather small nearly every seat is close to the field. Unlike in the US, Japanese baseball is a very rowdy interactive game for fans with organized chants, dancing and cheerleaders. The traditional way fans cheer for the Swallows is to open their umbrellas and sing a song, so be sure to come prepared!

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Inokashira Park
2 Tours and Activities

Located in the Kichijoji neighborhood of Tokho, Inokashira Park (more specifically the pond found within) was the first water source for Edo (now Tokyo) until a new water supply system was completed in 1898. The public park was established in 1917 and today is one of the city’s most popular and lively green spaces.

The long Inokashira Pond stretches east to west through the park, and tree-lined paths meander around it. Locals and visitors come to the park to picnic in the shade, rent paddle boats for a trip around the pond, feed the ducks or visit one of the park’s bigger attractions, a small zoo or the Ghibli Museum. On the weekends, local artists are often seen selling their wares while buskers perform for tips throughout the park. During spring, some 250 cherry trees surrounding the pond provide a stunning display of blossoms.

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Happo-en Garden
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2 Tours and Activities

Happo-en means "beautiful from every angle." When visiting the Happo-en Garden in Tokyo, you’ll see that the name doesn’t even begin to describe this Japanese garden and teahouse.

Take a stroll through tree-lined paths of century old bonsai, cherry, and maple trees. Take in the lush gardens and budding flowers surrounding a tranquil pond. Enjoy a traditional tea-ceremony served by women in elaborate kimonos. Then, enjoy a romantic dinner at Enju or Thrush, one of the two restaurants overlooking the lovely gardens.

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Tokyo Daijingu Shrine
2 Tours and Activities

If you are looking for love, make your way to Tokyo Daijingu Shrine. Two sun goddesses and three gods of creation and growth are enshrined here. Together, these deities are known to play matchmaker. Famous, too, for serving as the location for the first traditional Shinto wedding ceremony, Tokyo Daijingu is believed to bless marriages. On weekends, Tokyoites and Japanese from all over the region line up here to worship and ask the deities for blessing in love and marriage.

Tokyo Daijingu Shrine was founded in 1880 in the resemblance of the famous Ise Jingo Shrine located in Mie Prefecture. The original Ise Jingo was a famous pilgrimage for Shinto Japanese in the 17th century. Today, still, many make the pilgrimage to this famous shrine. Emperor Meiji deigned the creation of Tokyo Daijingu to facilitate worship of the enshrined deities without making the long trip to Mie. Today, Tokyo Daijingu remains one of the five great shrines of Tokyo.

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More Things to Do in Tokyo

Thunder Gate (Kaminarimon)

Thunder Gate (Kaminarimon)

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The symbol of the Asakusa neighborhood in Tokyo, Japan, the impressive, large, red Kaminarimon, or Thunder Gate, gives visitors a grand welcome to Senso-ji Temple (Asakusa Temple). Standing 38 feet tall (11.7 meters), Thunder Gate gets its powerful name from Raijin, the god of thunder, one of the two deities it honors. Four statues guard Thunder Gate: at the front, the Shinto gods of wind and thunder attract the most attention. The other two – a Buddhist god and goddess - rest at the reverse side of the gate. Under Kaminarimon, a giant red lantern draws the eye next. The fragile piece was restored and donated to the temple complex in August 2003 to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the start of the Edo period. Kaminarimon’s history dates back to the year 941, when a military commander constructed the now iconic gate. Over the centuries, it has been destroyed by fire at least three times, and has always been rebuilt on the same ground.

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Tokyo Joypolis

Tokyo Joypolis

1 Tour and Activity
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Toyo Bunko Museum

Toyo Bunko Museum

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Beni Fuji no Yu Onsen

Beni Fuji no Yu Onsen

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The Beni Fuji no Yu Onsen offers some of the best vantage points in the area. The large public bathhouse has both indoor baths and two rooftop ones, but no matter which pool you’re in, the views of Mt Fuji are stunning. The ones on the roof boast views of a zen garden and trees, as well as the majestic cone-shaped peak of Fuji in the distance. The outdoor baths are arguably best in the winter, when the hot, therapeutic water complements the cold air and snow-capped peak.

The onsen offers guests a multitude of services in addition to the baths. A restaurant serves local cuisine, while visitors can also purchase massages and beauty treatments. There is enough to do within the onsen that many people choose to spend an entire day here, making the unassuming onsen a true highlight of a trip to the Mt Fuji area.

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Japanese Sword Museum (Token Hakubutsukan)

Japanese Sword Museum (Token Hakubutsukan)

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This well-curated museum showcases the ancient art of sword making and is home to more than 150 artifacts. Swords, mountings, armor and metal work are beautifully displayed in this tiny Tokyo destination known as Token hakubutsukan by locals.

The four-story structure houses a gallery and bookstore, where items are available for purchase in a variety of languages. Displays offer visitors English translations with details on the design and use of swords, including some that date back more than 900 years.

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Tokyo Metro (Tokyo Subway)

Tokyo Metro (Tokyo Subway)

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Tokyo's underground subway service is a major part of the city's enormous and efficient rail network. Two companies operate here—Tokyo Metro and Toei Subway—and they connect to above-ground lines in the Greater Tokyo metropolitan area. Getting around this huge city by metro is easy, especially if you avoid peak rush hours.
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Seaside Top Observatory

Seaside Top Observatory

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Seaside Top is the observation deck of the World Trade Center Tokyo, a towering 40 story building. The Hamamatsu-cho subway station exits directly into the building making it easy to exit, pay the ¥620 fee and hop in the elevator.

At the top you'll find a unique view of Tokyo Bay, other skyscrapers like the Tokyo Tower and Tokyo Sky Tree and even Mount Fuji on a good day. Display screens with light up buttons help you to determine exactly what you're looking at. The deck is usually not crowded so you can linger and enjoy the 360 degree views. The night view is considered particularly romantic, but keep in mind that the deck closes at 8:30.

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Tokyo Solamachi

Tokyo Solamachi

1 Tour and Activity
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Tokyo SEA LIFE® Park

Tokyo SEA LIFE® Park

Across the bay from Tokyo Disneyland you will easily spot the distinctive glass dome of the city's largest aquarium. Located in Kasai Rinkai park, this government run aquarium is an inexpensive alternative to some of the city's flashier sea parks while still being quite impressive in its own right.

The exhibits each focus on sea life from a different environment: the Atlantic, Indian Ocean, the Caribbean and an extensive exhibit on the local Tokyo Bay. In the watery blue depths you'll encounter giant spider crabs, deep sea isopods, hammerhead sharks and more. There's an enormous theater style tuna exhibit. Outside of the water you'll encounter a waterbird sanctuary featuring puffins and a fun penguin exhibit. The park is also oddly home to Japan's largest Ferris Wheel.

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